television


16
Jan 19

Some fun videos for you today

These first two videos are some my students made. These are their first shows of the new semester; they’re getting back into the flow of things with some new crew who are coming up to speed quite rapidly. First, Hoosier News Source, a news show:

Then they produced What’s Up Weekly, which is a happenings and pop culture kind of show.

Here’s one I enjoyed today: Why it’s almost impossible to ride a bike 60 kilometers in one hour. It explains some of the effort and tech and physiology behind the fabled One Hour record:

You or I? We would not break that record. We wouldn’t even flirt with frightening it that we might fracture it.


15
Jan 19

So much was accomplished!

Woke up this morning for a run. The windchill was 22. There were snow flurries. I ran through something the National Weather Service called freezing fog. I don’t know what that is, meteorologically speaking, but let’s say what I ran through fit the bill.

It fit the bill.

Here’s one of my views, from just under halfway through my run:

This little field runs down into a man-made pond. I bet it is frozen right now.

I do not know what is happening.

All of the pavement was dry. But I did run on a path next to the local middle that was iced over. It seemed a bit inexplicable. Either the soccer field above the school had been storing up a lot of moisture and released it in sub-freezing weather or some middle schoolers had a little fun in the hopes of shutting things down.

They did not shut things down; the local educators are a hardy bunch. The pranksters, or the weeping field, only succeeded in slowing down my run.

My run didn’t need the help in slowing down.

Hit a grocery store for a few essentials, and wondered once again how it is that people can’t be bothered to put away their shopping carts. It is a small store, and is most decidedly used more by regulars than one-offs. Especially thoughtful is the person who routinely parks their cart in the handicapped parking spot. You know who was really appreciative of that soul? The elderly lady who climbed out of her SUV while I was moving that cart. She had to shuffle around the frozen snow piles on her cane, because she couldn’t park in the handicapped spot.

That’s at least the third time I’ve seen that happen there. I’m counting now. Last time I saw a guy actual leaving his cart there. It was a nice move, seeing as how he was in his work truck, covered in company livery, at the time. We had a pleasant conversation about it. For my part I complimented him on his ability to at least push the cart away from his own quarter panel.

Anyway, in the studio tonight:

Meredith, Caroline and Andrew have the latest stories and weather covering campus and town. That episode should be out in the morning.

Tonight I visited a tailor because there are alterations to be made to pants and, really, I needed the new adventure. Two pairs of slacks are getting taken in, and they’ll be ready for me next Tuesday. Whereupon I might take a few more pairs of slacks, as well. It was, as you might surmise, a great big ol’ party.

The nightcap was spaghetti and zinc and vitamin C chewables. And if I stop this here, I’ll have established a trend of finding my way to bed earlier and earlier.


27
Apr 18

Last shows of the year

IUSTV is winding down today. Their last five studio shows of the semester were produced this week and the last one this very afternoon. Now everyone is getting ready for finals and internships or finals and graduation and their first jobs. And I’m ready for a nap.

So here are this week’s shows.

Two seniors anchored the news show. One is headed north, to work up near the lakes, and one is headed to Georgia. Everyone else on the news shows should be back in the fall:

The pop culture show, also recorded on Tuesday nights, features another impressive senior we’re happy-sad to lose. Alex is going to be working at the local public television station over the summer. And we’ll probably all be working for her one day:

On Thursday, of course, we talked sports:

One sports director is graduating. Almost everyone else should be back.

On the sports talk show, there’s a lot of youth, and they’ve progressed nicely:

And then there’s the funny ha-ha show:

The show host gets “fired” at the end. It’s part of a large multimedia story arc they are planning. (They wanted me to do the “firing,” but my presence was required elsewhere during the shoot.) It’s pretty intense.


26
Apr 18

There’s so much to hear and see

I did an important podcast today. You should listen to this one, please:

If you haven’t listened to it yet, I talked with a reporter who has been covering the Rohingya refugee crisis and the genocide that precipitated it. This is a good conversation. You should listen.

Also, the religion in media conference wrapped up today, but not until we enjoyed two more sessions. This quote was somewhat thematic of part of the day:

If you weren’t there you missed out, but we streamed them, so you can still catch up. If you’re interested in visual storytelling the first panel is for you. The second is about gaming and while that’s not my thing I must say the presenters were quite compelling. You can watch both panels right here:

Then, another night in the studio with these guys:

I think I hit my 40 hours for the week before noon today, but the shows must go on. And these were the last sports shows of the semester. The sports folks are graduating their sports director. He’ll be working in the production unit for some professional franchise before long. He did a nice job here, and we’re expecting more big things from him, and from the rest of these guys too.

And tomorrow, an entirely new conference begins here. That kind of week.


24
Apr 18

Oh a busy week, indeed

Look!

Spring! Spring is here! Again!

And it looks like it’ll hold for more than two days in a row this time!

We’re working a conference this week. I’ve been helping out with some of the details for a few months now. It’s a symposium on religion in media. And this evening saw the opening remarks and the keynote speaker. Here’s our dean, Jim Shanahan, welcoming the conference’s many guests:

And after hearing most of the keynote speaker, a former religion editor for Reuters, I had to hustle back over to our building and into the studio:

It was the last night in the studio for the news crew the semester, and we send off a small handful of seniors, ready to find their way and make their mark:

One of the soon-to-be grads will be working in northern Indiana, the other in Georgia.

More shows!

And tonight I got student evaluations, the only ones that matter to me:

And I wound down the night with The Dishwashing Sessions: