IU


4
May 18

Strategic planning

There is no parking here. This makes sense in a parking lot adjacent to campus on the day before graduation. This isn’t the biggest lot, and it is filled with faculty and staff. But if you block the bulk of it off those people have to of course go elsewhere with their cars for the day and that’s going to be an imposition on others.

It isn’t a problem for me. I typically park in a deck behind all of this. But it is amusing. I’m sure someone had a reason for this and it will become obvious soon.

At the end of the work day the barriers have been reconfigured. (I wonder, too, what was behind that move.) It gave a few spaces back, but for the full day these spots were removed from service for some reason:

I’m sure someone had a good reason for this.

Tonight we are trying a new side-head grip for her face cuddling.
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She loves having her head held. It’s not a squeeze or anything, and no one makes her do this. In fact she’ll work her little face into your hand if you leave it still long enough. I’ve looked this up, and it seems she might be trying to make me smell like her. Guess I’m the wrong kind of smelly.

Cat noses, what are you going to do?

We had some fine company recently, and our company brought us gifts and Allie got gifts, too.

They’re going over very well, as you can tell. Any toy that gets in her box is a sure hit.

OK. The blog is taking off next week, I think. But there will be a lot, a lot, of cool stuff in the few weeks after that. So do mark your calendars. And, in the meantime, you can find more on Twitter and check me out on Instagram as well.


3
May 18

Now here’s something of a different time

I had lunch with this guy today. It was, as you might imagine, very cool.

Dean Martin died when I was a freshman in college. And I wasn’t yet hip to who or what could bring about a lasting cool. I suppose he was always the guy that played drunk, or did the occasional telethon. He was one of the old guys that ran around with Sinatra and was old. I’m sure I knew he had done movies, but I didn’t know much about the Rat Pack and I certainly didn’t know much of his music. It was too far removed for me to be anything but too far removed myself, I suppose. (“Little Ole Wine Drinker Me” was a Charlie Walker song that Martin covered. It stayed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for six weeks. It peaked at fifth on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart and was also a hit in Australia that year.)

I really discovered him after college. His music. His cool. His sound. Dean Martin had the best sound of the Rat Pack.

And, man, he was funny. Just look who is on the stage with him here:

There’s a great Christmas-themed Pillsbury Flour spot and a too-artsy for 1975 America Revlon promo in the middle of the video, too.

And even when he was playing a song for laughs he could sing and sing:

I love that song.

One of our hallways at work has a lot of historic photos from the program. This lady is a part of one of the pictures:

She’s a copy editor in the 1940s at the IDS. But she’s given up her seat in the slot for Ernie Pyle, who has returned to Indiana to visit family and friends. And when he was home he was never far from campus, so here he’s back and reading the paper. The front page story that he’s reading is about the Romanian armistice, so she is looking over his shoulder as he reads a late-August, early-September paper from 1944.

I wonder what she was thinking about, sitting there, posing with the great Ernie Pyle in her seat. He’s a legend now, and he was well-venerated then. I wonder where those lamps got off too.

I looked her up. She might have become a school teacher. The woman I found online passed away just a few years ago. But I’m not 100 percent convinced I have the right person.

Tonight I’m hanging out with Allie, The Black Cat:

No better way to wind down an evening.


30
Apr 18

What I did at work on Saturday

We are going to finally, officially say it:

Spring is here, at last:

It was late, but is not here to last. We’ll probably move directly into summer in a week or two. But for the moment, you revel in it. This is what I was doing on Saturday. Outside, dancing between the daylight and the shade, enjoying the breeze and the temperature and my sunglasses and the sun, waiting on a donor to show up to our building on campus.

A gentleman wanted to give something to the Media School. It fell to me to help get the thing in the building. The gentleman chose Saturday, so there we were. And he was on his way, late, but on his way.

He hopes out of his SUV, his two middle school children and a film student, and they all start offloading chunks of cast iron. I knew what it was, or what it would be again when he had it indoors and reassembled, but in its constituent parts it didn’t look like much. And then you started looking at details. It’s an old car:

It has great tags, and easy-to-use controls:

The thing still worked, the donor said.

And this particular tag gave you the timeline. This is from about 1937. Still in working conditioning. Mechanically mint.

It was all made in the US. The East Coast and the Midwest. Do you know what it is yet?

The only problems are a few scratches on the finish, like this one:

And some peeling 80-year-old paint:

It has a glass piece on top, still original, still pristine:

And if you’re still trying to figure it out, this piece should look a bit familiar:

Here’s the top part, beneath is the big heavy cast iron setup:

And here’s the full machine:

This is a movie projector.
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It was donated by a locally-based actor, James Lee Guy, who is very successful in Chinese cinema. He donated it to The Media School because he is a passionate, passionate film fan. He’s owned it for several years, having picked it up from a man who was running a private screening room in his home a few towns away. Before that this had been in a drive-in theater. Guy estimates it was made in about 1937. It still works and now is a fine display piece.
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A most generous donation, indeed.


27
Apr 18

Last shows of the year

IUSTV is winding down today. Their last five studio shows of the semester were produced this week and the last one this very afternoon. Now everyone is getting ready for finals and internships or finals and graduation and their first jobs. And I’m ready for a nap.

So here are this week’s shows.

Two seniors anchored the news show. One is headed north, to work up near the lakes, and one is headed to Georgia. Everyone else on the news shows should be back in the fall:

The pop culture show, also recorded on Tuesday nights, features another impressive senior we’re happy-sad to lose. Alex is going to be working at the local public television station over the summer. And we’ll probably all be working for her one day:

On Thursday, of course, we talked sports:

One sports director is graduating. Almost everyone else should be back.

On the sports talk show, there’s a lot of youth, and they’ve progressed nicely:

And then there’s the funny ha-ha show:

The show host gets “fired” at the end. It’s part of a large multimedia story arc they are planning. (They wanted me to do the “firing,” but my presence was required elsewhere during the shoot.) It’s pretty intense.


26
Apr 18

There’s so much to hear and see

I did an important podcast today. You should listen to this one, please:

If you haven’t listened to it yet, I talked with a reporter who has been covering the Rohingya refugee crisis and the genocide that precipitated it. This is a good conversation. You should listen.

Also, the religion in media conference wrapped up today, but not until we enjoyed two more sessions. This quote was somewhat thematic of part of the day:

If you weren’t there you missed out, but we streamed them, so you can still catch up. If you’re interested in visual storytelling the first panel is for you. The second is about gaming and while that’s not my thing I must say the presenters were quite compelling. You can watch both panels right here:

Then, another night in the studio with these guys:

I think I hit my 40 hours for the week before noon today, but the shows must go on. And these were the last sports shows of the semester. The sports folks are graduating their sports director. He’ll be working in the production unit for some professional franchise before long. He did a nice job here, and we’re expecting more big things from him, and from the rest of these guys too.

And tomorrow, an entirely new conference begins here. That kind of week.