Friday


22
Mar 19

Back on the GoT binge

We’re making progress, which is more than you can say for some of these characters.

It occurs to me that you can actually get some classics out of this.



8
Mar 19

This won’t be the last time, I’m sure

Do you know what’s worse than someone who doesn’t properly put away a shopping cart? Someone who leaves a shopping cart in other parking spaces.

Do you know what’s worse than someone who leaves a shopping cart in other parking spaces? Someone who leaves a shopping cart in a handicap spot.

And do you know what’s worse than someone who leaves a shopping cart in a handicapped spot? Someone who leaves a shopping cart in a handicap spot in bad weather.

Oh, and by the way:

Some television to keep us warm:


1
Mar 19

I am serious about being casual

Today I decided to rock the fox cufflinks:

I have some cufflinks, of course, and I’ve settled on my preferred style. These are close to them, and I made them. It’s simply an oversized button, a few links of chain and a smaller button. Open the outside links of the chain, feed them through the clasp, close the loops up and there you go. Now, the smaller button is on the inside, and you can feed it through all of the french cuff button holes. The bigger button won’t pass through and so the cuff is sure to be held together. Plus, in this case, that’s a colorful cufflink!

So I’m wearing cufflinks, but they are silly.

Student television:

And television at home, as we head into the weekend:

We’re watching all of the episodes as a ramp up to the final season of Game of Thrones. Six episodes each weekend until the final shows. It’s about to get painful.


22
Feb 19

There’s a new mobile version of the site

Everything worked out pretty well with the mobile site. Click this image and you can go see it for yourself.

So that’s now live. For some time I’ve been tinkering with a mobile version as a Monday project. But then I hit some snags with my ideas and life gets busy and you start making concessions to that or just going to sleep on time and you place on the back burner the mobile version of your website that everyone is just dying to see on their phones and tablets and what not.

You know how it goes.

But I started tinkering with it again yesterday, because in doing a few quick things elsewhere on the site I remembered ‘This was a project you’ve forgotten about.‘ Much to my chagrin.

This is all just a coding exercise, of course. An in-expensive hobby. And if there’s some utility to it for you or me, then even better.

It started in college. The summer between my freshman and sophomore year I was hanging out with a friend who had graduated, gone into the world and come back for grad school. He told me that if I learned to code I’d add $10,000 a year to my paycheck. So I had another friend, who was legitimately one of the smartest people any of us knew, help get me started while he was working as a student staffer in a computer lab. And, because I was cool I spent that summer learning things by trial and error.

This was, of course, back in the days when we used to code by hand, in Notepad. And I found a rhythm for making a few changes, saving the file, uploading it and refreshing pages that I liked. The trial-and-error of it was usually relaxing. The first guy in that anecdote is now a big shot economist and university lecturer. The second one, last I checked, was a successful salesman. And here I am. Coding was a part of my internship during college and an important part of my professional career for more than a dozen years. I am still waiting on those coding bonuses to show up in my checks.

Indeed, for more than four years it was a primary function of my work, back when al.com was a growing-out-of-being-a-secondary consideration. I was coding something everyday. And I was a journalist, what’s more. Probably there were a dozen or so people in the state who could do both back then. In my first interview there I made this tortured analogy about how I was a driver, more than a mechanic. I can take care of your car while you are abroad for a year or two, but you wouldn’t ask me to build you a race car from the ground up.

They hired me anyway.

Anyway, there’s a new mobile version. It’s responsive to size and which angle you are holding your phone in. And the secondary picture accidentally matches the primary photo, so now there’s a color scheme. Wish me luck keeping that consistent.

Elsewhere …


And your weekend plans? I’ll probably running. But what about you?


15
Feb 19

It goes to four — going to 11 would squish you

So The Yankee got herself a present. (But she also says it is for us. And she did make way so that I could try it, but that ruins the joke of it.) Some 18 months or so after I got her a lower leg manual air compression recovery system she upgraded to a full-legged, machine operated, automatic, systematic, hydromatic, greased lightning recovery system.

She says, “If you need me … you don’t. I’m busy and I’m never leaving this chair.”

But, “I got them for us. We can share,” she said.

That was just after “Would you bring me all the things I need to conduct my life from here?”

But we can both use it, you see. I did get to get it a try. These are my legs:

There are four zones: quads, knees, calves and feet. At first, I did’t think my quads would allow the things to inflate properly, but the calves and the feet segments are impressive. And my knees! That probably isn’t supposed to feel as nice as it did, but it did. There is a small series of programmable choices you can make within the system, and then within the zones you have a choice between four compression levels. Level one is a nice firm embrace. Level four is like a blood pressure cuff applied by an over-anxious nurse on the first day of the job.

I started out with the third level, and was suitably impressed. Risk taker that I am, from the comfort of my own reclining chair in the living room, I bumped that miracle of modern psychotherapeutic and muscular medicine up to four, the highest level, whereby I was sent back in time to the War of 1812.

And I had a bear of a time getting back. It was very difficult to find outlets to plug this device into in 1812, let me tell you.

But, while I was there, I got to try level four. On my feet, you could feel the bones being moved together, which was a curious sensation. It felt nice on the knees, and it was noticeable on my quads. I have large thigh muscles, so I was skeptical, and I was right on that point. But on the calves, you better not be claustrophobic, have nightmares about being crushed or the general state of electrical research in the early 19th century. Oh it’s great fun, or nanty narking, as they said back there in that part of the Victorian Age. But if you want to go all the way up to level four on your calves, you better come mentally prepared.

And it was at this point when I thought, you know, I might not be wearing these boots just right. So a few adjustments were made. And then I could feel it, in the right position these things properly inflated in the quads. It was then that I sent away for all of the things I need to conduct my life from that spot.

I only left to go see this in the studio this morning: