Friday


18
Jan 19

We skipped town for the weekend

There’s going to be snow at our house. But we are not there. It is several degrees warmer here. And we will see the soon and clear skies for a few days. It is a glorious thing.

Guess where we are. This is your clue:

Any further visual clues would give it away.

We’ve been here many times. It was the first trip The Yankee took together, in fact, as a grad school bit of tourism. We were going to go elsewhere on our second trip, but the chosen place was under threat of a hurricane. So we came back to this place, and had another great time. And then, for a long time, we visited once or twice a year.

Finally, we got engaged here. Well, not right there at that sign. I’ve always wondered what made steps historic. Did something happen at these steps? Did they play a role? Or are they just old, and un-square? Solid, but unevenly spaced? We got engaged a mile up the road, in a historic park, where things did happen, which is square and old and evenly spaced, as laid out in the town’s grid system and carefully delineated in its modern incarnation by surveyors. It was 10 acres when it was first created in the 1840s, and became 30 acres in the next few decades. Today you’d see it as a rectangle on a map. It’s an easy mile around the perimeter, 1.3 million square feet. Just across the street was where we got married.

In the middle of that park, on the spot where this picture was taken, that’s where we got engaged:

That picture was from three years ago, which was the last time we’d been there, which was another great trip, but it’s obviously been too long in between visits.

Do you know where we are yet?

We’re in Savannah, Georgia.

We are staying at an AirBnB right across the street from our favorite little breakfast cafe. We walked down to the touristy area for a few things, then just sat in a park, enjoying the weather and the views. And I sat beside this note:

We went for a jog around the park this evening. A quick three laps make for a quick three miles before dinner. Here’s a wide and long shot of the big fountain in Forsyth Park:

And later in the evening, we tried this:

View this post on Instagram

Status.

A post shared by Kenny Smith (@kennydsmith) on

So, yes, it was a good day.


14
Sep 18

Welcome to the weekend

My online friend Susan Crowell is editor at Farm and Dairy. Today she shared a photo, and a story, of the unveiling of a new historic marker in Fredericktown, Ohio. That’s the home of the original FFA corduroy jacket. That famous blue item goes back to 1933, and it still means a lot to many of us.

There’s a mention that the jackets were uninsulated, which should bring forward a memorable shiver from anyone who has ever worn one someplace like Kansas City in November, or somewhere perhaps even colder.

This is the best part …

The two gentlemen that helped with the unveiling are now 99 years young. They wore some of the original corduroy jackets.

This picture isn’t of those guys, but some of my friends, in some of our last FFA jackets.

Last night‘s show from IUSTV:

Now in full on weekend mode, which is starting like this:

So you’ve seen the Twitter feed in this post. Be sure to check out Instagram as well. Tomorrow, a bike ride!


7
Sep 18

To the immediate days ahead of you

I had two ideas today. That’s a lot for me. One of them, I suggested to someone, and you could see the notion percolating in the imagination of another person. That was neat. How often do you get to see the whole range of expression from blank expectation to unsold kernel growing into a ‘tell me more’ moment? And then you have to tell the person more and you know someone might be able to run with it. And finally, there’s the note-taking, and the ‘Let’s talk more about this?’

My other idea is perfectly formed, it arose in one clear moment with a precise degree of technical certainty, so much so that I sought out some information that might put the lie to the entire concept. But, no, the idea sound. So I’ll need to figure out some way to polish it up a little bit, so I can suggest it to some people so nothing will come of it.

A man told me once I was an idea guy. I wasn’t, but I liked the notion and have tried to incorporate a bit of that into everything I do ever since. Very, very occasionally someone will run with my idea of the moment. Usually it is dismissed, until someone else thinks it up. Then it’s brilliant. Ideas are about timing, their framing and who pitches them.

How was your day?

For a moment late this moment all my Apple products were each charged to 100 percent. I may never again achieve Inbox Zero, but I’ve made my peace with that. Apple 100 is a bigger challenge anyway.

This afternoon’s official music video, because this afternoon needs an official video. The chorus makes it worth it:

I’m writing this at the best part of the week, the idealism of the weekend is upon us. It hasn’t really sunk in yet — for me, that’s usually when I turn in and realize I can turn off my alarm clock for tomorrow.

Of course, right after that I begin to think of how finite the weekend can be. Maybe they should all be three-day weekends, after all. There’s a feeling that never goes away, so there must be something to it.

Regardless of how long this weekend is going to be for you, I hope it is a blast.


4
May 18

Strategic planning

There is no parking here. This makes sense in a parking lot adjacent to campus on the day before graduation. This isn’t the biggest lot, and it is filled with faculty and staff. But if you block the bulk of it off those people have to of course go elsewhere with their cars for the day and that’s going to be an imposition on others.

It isn’t a problem for me. I typically park in a deck behind all of this. But it is amusing. I’m sure someone had a reason for this and it will become obvious soon.

At the end of the work day the barriers have been reconfigured. (I wonder, too, what was behind that move.) It gave a few spaces back, but for the full day these spots were removed from service for some reason:

I’m sure someone had a good reason for this.

Tonight we are trying a new side-head grip for her face cuddling.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

She loves having her head held. It’s not a squeeze or anything, and no one makes her do this. In fact she’ll work her little face into your hand if you leave it still long enough. I’ve looked this up, and it seems she might be trying to make me smell like her. Guess I’m the wrong kind of smelly.

Cat noses, what are you going to do?

We had some fine company recently, and our company brought us gifts and Allie got gifts, too.

They’re going over very well, as you can tell. Any toy that gets in her box is a sure hit.

OK. The blog is taking off next week, I think. But there will be a lot, a lot, of cool stuff in the few weeks after that. So do mark your calendars. And, in the meantime, you can find more on Twitter and check me out on Instagram as well.


27
Apr 18

Last shows of the year

IUSTV is winding down today. Their last five studio shows of the semester were produced this week and the last one this very afternoon. Now everyone is getting ready for finals and internships or finals and graduation and their first jobs. And I’m ready for a nap.

So here are this week’s shows.

Two seniors anchored the news show. One is headed north, to work up near the lakes, and one is headed to Georgia. Everyone else on the news shows should be back in the fall:

The pop culture show, also recorded on Tuesday nights, features another impressive senior we’re happy-sad to lose. Alex is going to be working at the local public television station over the summer. And we’ll probably all be working for her one day:

On Thursday, of course, we talked sports:

One sports director is graduating. Almost everyone else should be back.

On the sports talk show, there’s a lot of youth, and they’ve progressed nicely:

And then there’s the funny ha-ha show:

The show host gets “fired” at the end. It’s part of a large multimedia story arc they are planning. (They wanted me to do the “firing,” but my presence was required elsewhere during the shoot.) It’s pretty intense.