Monday


16
Apr 18

More of that, again

I wrote this on Saturday: A slow(er than usual) four-mile jog, but at least it finally felt like spring. Finally, begrudgingly, not-without-a-fight, spring. And, look! It was! Spring!

Today, a whole new season! That’s not true! This season never really left!

Look, there’s video proof!

Status …

A post shared by Kenny Smith (@kennydsmith) on

We live in a snow globe! And why not it is … checking the calendar … April 16th!

‪We live in a snow globe. ‬#Bloomington #Indiana #indianauniversity

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Maybe March’s spring weather will show up in May.

But don’t count on it.

I did a monologue. Why not?

Dishwashing music:


9
Apr 18

Stuff from after the conference

We were in Nashville over a long weekend at a research conference. It was nice to see friends and do smart-people things. And we stayed with friends who happen to live by the conference location. So we’re going to need them to move around and follow this event around the region. They should do this to the detriment of their own social lives and careers so that they could have the pleasure of hosting us for three or four days each year, and enjoy barbecue and the like, and our delightful company.

So we’ll start sending them some brochures.

Anyway, some extra things I saw over the weekend.

Look! Up in the right corner!

That doesn’t look like a familiar Sears font. A commenter on Flickr notes:

Sears Department Store was located at the southeast corner of Church St and 8th Ave North (the building is still standing) … Remember that agriculture was, for a couple of centuries, The primary source of revenue in and around Nashville. Sears, like Montgomery Wards and others, sold farm supplies and equipment.

Just south on 8th, right behind the main store, was the farm and auto supply store … The “Ghost Sign” you photographed is located across 8th Ave North from where the farm and auto store once was and this sign once had an arrow that pointed across the street. Sears moved to their new brick bldg on Lafayette (Now the Nashville Rescue Mission) in the late 60’s. I suspect this sign was repainted in the 60s just prior to Sears moving, hence it has survived (sans arrow).

That comment is eight years old and, today, it is just a parking lot:

But you can see a picture here, it was a grand old 1930s art deco building. Sears, this Nashville history site tells me, stayed in the building until 1956. A Ben Franklin went in, and then a jewelry store. Eventually it became a building for state offices. That site, in 2014, said the building was still there, but its fate was nigh. And the Google Street view, from 2017, tells the tale:

They paved downtown shopping and put up a parking lot. But The Tennessean put together a photo gallery.

Hey, look, this is where my folks got married!

Union Station in Nashville, Tennessee.

Farmland when we got back on the road:

And I don’t know what these are for …

Some agricultural concern, no doubt.


2
Apr 18

Speaking of April fools

It snowed yesterday. This being spring, and that being the first day of April it made perfect sense:

And it stuck around until this morning and this afternoon.

This being spring, after all. Last night’s snow was the third we’ve had this spring and the fourth or fifth since these guys came out of the ground …

Better to stay inside, curl up and be warm indoors. Because its spring and all that. Here’s a podcast we did for today. It has to do with sports, primarily basketball, which is played indoors.

Also, it’s a good day to cuddle up to the black cat, who, I’m pretty sure, just wants warmer weather. And tuna:

A show the sports crew produced last week and released yesterday:


26
Mar 18

I stayed indoors

It snowed this weekend …

And I found this Alec Wilkinson quote: “One of the reasons there are so many terms for conditions of ice is that the mariners observing it were often trapped in it, and had nothing to do except look at it.”

Wilkinson was writing about S. A. Andrée, the visionary Swedish aeronaut who, in 1897, during the great age of Arctic endeavor, left to discover the North Pole by flying to it in a hydrogen balloon.

Andrée and the two other members of his expedition crashed and then lived on the ice for another three months, before they died in some way that’s still a mystery. It was 33 years before the bodies were found, so it’s not as bad as all of that here, I took that picture and went back inside, but still.

It kept snowing.

So I worked in the garage. And I turned my hand sander into a mounted tool. I just cut out a hole in a box and wedged the sander in there:

It worked really well. I could move a piece of wood around the belt rather than the sander over the wood. So I guess I’ll need to build a more permanent version of this one day.

It let me sand this piece into something approaching an even roundness:

I’m making a gift for someone. And I took a bit of scrap pine:

And cut, and sanded, it down to this:

Its a book holder out of a bit of scrap wood. It helps prevent hand strain and keeps the book from closing up on you. Works pretty well, but the thumb hole is too big. That’s why you make prototypes.


19
Mar 18

This got a little Twitter heavy

This was Saturday morning:

I’m not sure who’s fault this was — or put another way, stayed in bed longer — but I’m sure it wasn’t Allie. That’s a Saturday morning, though, and that’s not too bad.

Here are a few things I found interesting this weekend and today …

Think about that. A man born before the Civil War, became president twice and had kids comparatively late in life. And then most of his children were long-lived. Three of them into my lifetime. His youngest died when I was in college. If you were in New Hampshire, you might have met the man who died as the oldest presidential offspring. Francis Grover Cleveland was in the poultry business, and was in the theater. He ran a barnstorming summer stock program that he founded in the 1930s.

Starting in 1966, Mr. Cleveland perennially talked of retirement and the possibility that his aptly called nonprofit theater might have to close. Yet, despite failing eyesight, Mr. Cleveland again directed some of last summer’s fare, opening the season with “The Front Page” in July and closing with “The Fantasticks” in early September.

Mr. Cleveland was born in Buzzards Bay, Mass., the youngest of four children of Grover Cleveland, the nation’s 22d and 24th President. His father, a frequent summer visitor in Tamworth, died in 1908, when the boy was 5.

Mr. Cleveland graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard College. He briefly taught private school in Cambridge, Mass., but then opted for the stage. He acted in Boston and later in New York, where he had cameo roles on Broadway in the original productions of “Dead End” and “Our Town.”

Speaking of history:

This was about five months before I started blogging, so thankfully there are no archives to look through, but I remember that trip well. I got some pretty good tape for my journalism career out of the deal, and I landed a terrific friend out of the trip, and some other friends still carry on the long-running Ann Taylor gag because of this trip. I remember much about it and have yet to figure out what it should feel like in a capitol city when the nation has just gone to war. I walked through Dupont Circle thinking everyone seemed very casual, considering.

Just casually moving on in the WNIT tournament:

The only time of year I even take a stab at paying attention to basketball is during the postseason, of course. And, of course, the women’s game is always more entertaining.

Somewhat entertaining:

And, finally, this is very entertaining, some people re-made the Avengers trailer on the cheap:

I’d watch that movie.

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