26
Feb 19

That time of night you get the tiniest bit introspective

I’ve had jobs where I got off work to go to another job. I’ve had roles where quitting time was at 3 p.m. At one place I’d done a full day’s work by noon. You can do the math on that. In another I had nights where I was still in the newsroom until 3 or even 4 a.m. In that case the tweet, above, might not have always be applicable after an 18-hour day. But you get the idea.

These days, I spend a few nights a week in the studio with students until they wrap up at 8. Every so often, like tonight, an unlucky soul will stick around and we’ll talk and, if they aren’t careful, they have to listen to me drone on and on. Tonight we chatted about the future and potential plans and goals. Hearing a student or two sharing those out loud, and trying to offer a little framework or encouragement around the ideas, is probably the best work of the day.

Also, we met this nice lady:

Please forgive the sound. I was just recording the interview off of a preview monitor in the control room while the actual conversation took place in the studio. Our reporter, and all-around ace-in-the-hole, Meredith Struewing got the newly crowned Miss Indiana University in for an early interview. She’s a theater major, Julia Klinestiver, and is apparently new to this whole pageant thing. She’s a sharp one, as you can tell, but she doesn’t take it too seriously:

It was neat to hear her talk about her project going into schools with Billy the Bard, and Meredith is going to be following her progress. We all sat and talked about that long after the studio lights had been turned off. It’s corny, but I’m listening to the two of them talk about the short term and it was enough to make you feel optimistic about the long term. They, and so many of their peers, have got such bright futures ahead of them, and that’ll benefit us all.

Those crowns, by the way, are apparently heavier than you’d think.

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25
Feb 19

Hittin’ my stride

There I was, trying to do a duckface after a 10K … It snowed in the morning, but was sunny all afternoon. The wind was this series of ridiculous, swirling gusts. At one point, in a distance of less than 50 yards, I got 20-30 mile per hour winds from three different directions. Serious wind. So there I was, at the end of this little run, trying to make a duckface …

“Hey! You’re getting in the way of me trying to make a duck face so I can put that over Greek mythology jokes on social media!”

This evening was a speed workout. I don’t think I go any faster during it, and I have seen no cumulative effects. Not that I expect any, but still. It’s my second least favorite run. The Yankee is getting faster because of them. This is having a negative effect on me. Do you know how hard I have to work to get far ahead of her?

I need to be that far ahead so I can get my phone ready to shoot video. And I have to do that several times so I can make a little video project:

I’m telling you, she’s really benefiting from those speed workouts. Me, not so much.

Elsewhere, still more people who are better at athletic things than I am!

They said she wasn’t even trying to do much here, either, which is mind-boggling, and more than a little intimidating.

She’s looking to nationals, you see. So that, to the two-time gold medalist, is taking it easy. Unreal.



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22
Feb 19

There’s a new mobile version of the site

Everything worked out pretty well with the mobile site. Click this image and you can go see it for yourself.

So that’s now live. For some time I’ve been tinkering with a mobile version as a Monday project. But then I hit some snags with my ideas and life gets busy and you start making concessions to that or just going to sleep on time and you place on the back burner the mobile version of your website that everyone is just dying to see on their phones and tablets and what not.

You know how it goes.

But I started tinkering with it again yesterday, because in doing a few quick things elsewhere on the site I remembered ‘This was a project you’ve forgotten about.‘ Much to my chagrin.

This is all just a coding exercise, of course. An in-expensive hobby. And if there’s some utility to it for you or me, then even better.

It started in college. The summer between my freshman and sophomore year I was hanging out with a friend who had graduated, gone into the world and come back for grad school. He told me that if I learned to code I’d add $10,000 a year to my paycheck. So I had another friend, who was legitimately one of the smartest people any of us knew, help get me started while he was working as a student staffer in a computer lab. And, because I was cool I spent that summer learning things by trial and error.

This was, of course, back in the days when we used to code by hand, in Notepad. And I found a rhythm for making a few changes, saving the file, uploading it and refreshing pages that I liked. The trial-and-error of it was usually relaxing. The first guy in that anecdote is now a big shot economist and university lecturer. The second one, last I checked, was a successful salesman. And here I am. Coding was a part of my internship during college and an important part of my professional career for more than a dozen years. I am still waiting on those coding bonuses to show up in my checks.

Indeed, for more than four years it was a primary function of my work, back when al.com was a growing-out-of-being-a-secondary consideration. I was coding something everyday. And I was a journalist, what’s more. Probably there were a dozen or so people in the state who could do both back then. In my first interview there I made this tortured analogy about how I was a driver, more than a mechanic. I can take care of your car while you are abroad for a year or two, but you wouldn’t ask me to build you a race car from the ground up.

They hired me anyway.

Anyway, there’s a new mobile version. It’s responsive to size and which angle you are holding your phone in. And the secondary picture accidentally matches the primary photo, so now there’s a color scheme. Wish me luck keeping that consistent.

Elsewhere …


And your weekend plans? I’ll probably running. But what about you?


21
Feb 19

It’s a site day

We’re once more spending today with my grandfather’s books. Specifically his old magazines. We Reader’s Digest, and today we’re continuing our gander at a few of the ads from this third issue of Reader’s Digest, the October 1966 issue. There are five images to check out today. And if you click on this one we’ve already seen, you’ll get the updated joke, and can skip forward from there to today’s additions.

If you’d like to check out all of the stuff I’ve posted from my grandfather’s books so far, start here.

And that link makes me realize I need to update the page so if you’ll pardon me for one second … (which turned into six minutes of fun with CSS) … there!

Well … you know how it goes. You start playing with one bit of code then you realize how fun that can be, so you roll up your sleeves and start back working on some other page you’ve put on the back burner.

And so, tomorrow, if everything works out, I’m going to roll out the new mobile version of the website. So it’s a site day. What’s in your sites?


20
Feb 19

Free lunches taste better

Had lunch here on a gift card thanks to the kindness of a colleague.

I had the chance to use a little Spanish and a few of the phrases I remember from German and Italian as well, and all for no particular reason. Top that, rest of the day.

The rest of the day could not top that. It tried, of course. It was a game effort, but really.

I ran a 10K this evening. It was chilly, sure, but not so cold that I could stay inside:

Probably I was just after this:

Not that I can talk about mileage …

A television show the students shot last night: